Prose Feature: Keeping Place Whole: A Review of Jamaal May’s HUM (Alice James Books, 2013), by Kristin George Bagdanov

March 4, 2016

I have a friend who has a condition called tinnitus—a constant ringing in the ears. Everything he hears is tinged with hum, like the buzz of a refrigerator you just learn to live with. Sometimes I wonder which he fears more—that the humming will never stop, or how quiet his life would be without it. […]

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Flesh of My Flesh

February 29, 2016

Contributor’s Marginalia: Rochelle Hurt on “The Clinic Bomber’s Mother” by Shara Lessley This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman –Genesis 2:23 On its surface, Shara Lessley’s “The Clinic Bomber’s Mother” is a carefully built character sketch in sonnet form. In fourteen sonically rich lines, Lessley describes the minutiae of […]

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Prose Feature: “The Texture and Proximity of the Human Voice: An Interview with Carmen Giménez Smith” by Emilia Phillips

February 26, 2016
Thumbnail image for Prose Feature: “The Texture and Proximity of the Human Voice: An Interview with Carmen Giménez Smith” by Emilia Phillips

Carmen Giménez Smith is the author of the memoir Bring Down the Little Birds and four poetry collections: Milk and Filth, Goodbye, Flicker, The City She Was, and Odalisque in Pieces. Milk and Filth was a finalist for the NBCC Award in Poetry. She is the recipient of a 2011 American Book Award, the 2011 Juniper […]

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Lit Well

February 22, 2016

Contributor’s Marginalia: Randall Mann on “Scale” by Kathy Fagan I have always been a massive fan of Kathy Fagan’s work; I love this subtle, disquieting poem. Just look at the first sentence: “At this point in our lives we expected to be more / satisfied with the lighting.” Indeed. I admire that “our,” presumptuous yet inclusive; she risks alienating […]

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Clench and Unclench

February 17, 2016

Contributor’s Marginalia: Aaron Krol on “Silence is Golden“ by Rochelle Hurt How do you make a one-trick poem worth your readers’ attention? Rochelle Hurt’s “Silence is Golden—” has one trick almost from start to finish: scrambling old proverbs and maxims into odd new contortions. “[A] bird in the fist is the worth / the whole wedding,” she kicks off […]

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